It seems like only yesterday that we decided to take this leap.  We led the kind of hectic life that you would expect from a suburban family with 3 young boys.  Most of our free time was full of homework, swim team, PTA meetings and home improvement projects.  The idea of leaving it all behind and stepping into the great unknown was a scary one.  It was formed on a beach on a family vacation to Hawaii.  We had taken the kids out of school for a week to get away from the stress of our daily lives.  It was the perfect trip and we were having so much fun as a family.  As the kids played in the waves we started talking about the loads of busy work that the school would assign to make up for our indulgent week.  We started laughing about how silly the busy work was and how little they were really missing.  Wouldn’t it be great if we could travel more?  Aren’t they learning valuable lessons while traveling?  Wouldn’t it be great if we could travel all the time?

Just for fun, we started to research options.  We researched home schooling, road schooling and unschooling.  We read travel blogs written by families who travel the world with kids younger than ours.  We debated details, would we rent out or sell our house?  Should we sell our cars?  Could we take our kids away from their friends?  What about swim team?  What will our family think?  Are we crazy?

Somehow fit everything into one POD... well, almost everything!

Somehow fit everything into one POD… well, almost everything!

What we finally realized is that it’s really not that complicated.  Traveling as a family is a rewarding experience.  It brings you closer as a family, teaches your children about other cultures and ways of life and you learn about what you really need to get by.  It’s given us all the realization, in different ways, that we can live out of our comfort zone, and that we don’t need all of our ‘stuff’ to be happy.

We’ve been traveling since 2013, visiting Western Europe, Mexico, Costa Rica, Belize, Canada, and the US.  Sometimes we visit several cities in a short time, and sometimes we “slow travel”, spending weeks or months in one location, getting to know the people and the pace of life in a new part of the world.

“For my part, I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move.”

Robert Louis Stevenson